The Lighted Chalice for November 2014

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS

NOVEMBER 2

  • Guest at Your Table”
  • Worship Leader: Rev. Charlie Davis
  • Worship Associate: Dianna Poindexter
  • Sound: Mike Marsh
  • Fellowship Team: Beth Misner, Barny Dunning
  • Pulpit Preparation: Robin Poindexter
  • Sharing of Joys & Concerns
  • The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee is our movement’s arm of justice and compassion. By placing a box at your table during the Thanksgiving season and putting in your spare change, you help people around the world.

 

NOVEMBER 9

  • “Emerson”
  • Worship Leader: Rev. Charlie Davis
  • Worship Associate: Michael Lewis
  • Sound: Gary Mueller
  • Fellowship Team: Julia Colby
  • Pulpit Preparation: Nina Kirkpatrick
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson’s presence in Unitarian Universalism is still felt today. His philosophy of nature and self-reliance shapes who we are.

NOVEMBER 16

  • “The Risk of Rescuing”
  • Worship Leader: Rev. Charlie Davis
  • Worship Associate: Kris Taylor
  • Sound: Mary Finley
  • Fellowship Team: Kathy Willowoode
  • Pulpit Preparation: Nina Kirkpatrick
  • When I worked as a lifeguard, I was taught to make sure I was safe before trying to rescue anyone. This lesson has applications to interpersonal relationships and the politics of war.

NOVEMBER 23

  • “Thankful for Mistakes”
  • Worship Leader: Rev. Charlie Davis
  • Worship Associate: TBA
  • Sound: Carl Seese
  • Fellowship Team: TBA
  • Pulpit Preparation: Nina Kirkpatrick
  • Sometime the best-laid plans go awry; sometimes the best things happen accidentally. We never know when we will find a blessing in disguise.

NOVEMBER 23: Interfaith Thanksgiving at 4:30pm

The Inter-Religious Network is sponsoring an interfaith Thanksgiving service at St Thomas Aquinas Church, 535 W. State Street, West Lafayette. Bring a donation of food or money for Food Finders Food Bank.

NOVEMBER 30

  • “When is enough, enough?”
  • Worship Leader: Jody Tishmack
  • Worship Associate: TBA
  • Sound: Jason Dufair
  • Fellowship Team: Kat Braz
  • Pulpit Preparation: Nina Kirkpatrick
  • Americans consume more goods and resources per person than any other country. How can we learn to consume less? When our basic needs are met, living a simple life can offer more happiness than acquiring more things.

Sunday Forum

Sunday Morning Forum meets at 9 am in Room 101/103. Everyone is welcome! Childcare is provided. Co-chairs: Jim Anderson, Tom McConville, Bill Welge

  • November 2: Martha Gipson: “Empowering Students through Autobiographical Writing”
  • November 9: Kendall Smith, Michael Crowthers & Tom Adler: “The Greater Lafayette Art Museum”
  • November 16: Frontline news story video “The Trouble with Antibiotics”
  • November 23: Aurelie Jacquet: TBA
  • November 30: Terry Usrey: "The Potential for Solar Energy in Indiana". (Updated 11/5/14)

MINISTER’S MUSINGS

Why are we asked to be grateful in nature’s starkest season?
The trees have lost their royal robes of many colors.
The barren ground lies naked without a blanket of snow.
It is the season of brown and grey;
Smoke from smoldering leaves,
Branches etched against the clouds,
Mud in the freezing rain.

Why not be grateful in nature’s starkest season?
Devoid of beauty, we notice pedestrian blessings.
As we shuffle through life’s debris,
The crisp air reminds us of our blessed lungs.
It is quiet enough to hear one’s heart.
An indoor conversation with a friend.
Begins the cozy season.
Life becomes intentional
One makes preparations and invitations
To dine around the table.

I am grateful for nature’s starkest season.
Being forced to count blessings,
When they are hard to find,
Reminds me that they are always there.
Life stripped down to its essence
Is essentially blessed.

With Gratitude and Hope,
Rev. Charlie

 FROM THE BOARD PRESIDENT

The harvest is underway, and after the last fields are plowed and the corn silos filled (I really have no firsthand knowledge of these processes!), it’s time to stop and give thanks for the abundance. Harvest Festivals and Days of Thanksgiving are not uniquely North American; it seems logical that if you have a harvest, you stop and give thanks for that.

Some people stop to give thanks year round; they pray, meditate, or even keep “Gratitude Journals.” I’m not that organized, but I do try to take a moment every day or so to remember to thank at least one person for making my life better in some way. And every time I walk into our church building, I give a big thanks for its continued existence.

But now, I want to take this opportunity to express my gratitude:

To Rev. Charlie: Thank you for ministering to us. Thank you for your words, your actions, for making this community a better place for all of us.

To Karin, for being the pleasant “face” of our church. Thank you for keeping our church running smoothly.

To Rae and Joe, for keeping our building and our grounds looking great and functioning, a safe environment for all of us.

To the DRE Search Committee and Task Force, for bringing Nicole to us and for all those things you did to keep our Religious Exploration program running smoothly in the meantime. A huge thanks to Michelle Miller, our interim DRE!

To our musicians, for brightening our lives with your music every Sunday. And for all the hours of practice beforehand!

To those who take charge of committees and to those who serve on committees. I do appreciate all those hours you donate to our church. A special “shout-out” to those who serve on our Board and Finance Committee; it is because of your diligence and careful deliberation that our church continues to have a place in this community.

To our Fellowship Teams, for being here every Sunday to welcome all, provide nourishment, and make sure the building is closed again when the last person leaves.

To those of you with children — thank you for all your efforts in getting those young ones to church every Sunday. I know it’s no easy task, but please know your families fill our church building with light and life!

To Sherry Tripodi and members of the Stewardship Committee, for all your efforts during the Pledge Drive, and for doing what it takes to raise the necessary funds for our congregation. And an enormous thanks to those of you who give, generously, when asked.

And finally, thanks to all of you, for the smiles you give to strangers, the handshakes, arm pats, and hugs you give to each other, the kind words and friendliness. You make me feel welcome here, and I daresay you make each other feel welcome.

Thank you. Thank you for giving.
---Gale Charlotte, Board President

CHILD AND YOUTH RELIGIOUS EXPLORATION

Director of Religious Exploration, Nicole Rice, drenicolerice@yahoo.com

Looking Back

Oct. 1 was my first day as Director of Religious Exploration, and I can truly say that it was a month full of joy, learning, and celebration. I got to meet the RE students and other members of the congregation and received such a warm welcome. I got to participate in my first Diwali celebration and explore the beauty of the autumn season.

Looking Forward

November will be a busy month for the RE program. We’ll be participating in “Guest at your Table” and learning about the importance of food sustainability. We will also be exploring some important civil rights leaders and discussing the value and inherent worth of all living creatures. Finally, we will be preparing for several important upcoming events, such as the holiday program and the Giving Tree fundraiser. January will bring a new year and a lot of exciting events such as Our Whole Lives (OWL — comprehensive sexuality education), RE workshops, and monthly birthday celebrations.

Reminders

  • Let me know if you’d like to register your seventh-ninth-graders for OWL. It will be starting in January.
  • I am collecting winter holiday tradition stories to incorporate into the holiday program. Please e-mail me or feel free to drop off stories in my mailbox.
  • Make sure you have turned in the community survey (both students and adults) so that I can use it in planning events.
  • I am working on a website for RE (http://nmccabe.funkatrondigital.com). It is still in the developmental stage, so feel free to check it out and give me feedback.
  • Please see me on Sundays for a Giving Tree handout. It is an exciting fundraiser that the RE will be taking part in for the Christmas Jubilee.
  • Feel free to e-mail me with any comments, questions, or suggestions at drenicolerice@yahoo.com. You may also sign up for a time to meet with me on my door/mailbox.

Volunteer Opportunities

  • Teach a workshop.
  • Run a booth at the Giving Tree fundraiser on Nov. 23 from noon-2 p.m.
  • Be a field trip driver (The fifth-eighth grade students will be going shopping for the Christmas Jubilee on Dec. 7).
  • Become an RE guide or substitute.

Materials Needed

(May be dropped off in the DRE office)

These items are needed by 11/20 unless otherwise indicated.

  • cookies or other baked goods (can be brought in on Nov. 23, but let me know beforehand if you plan to contribute)
  • soup (can be brought in on Nov. 23, but let me know beforehand if you plan to contribute)
  • hot chocolate packets, tea bags, popcorn (popcorn machine)
  • popcorn bags
  • plastic spoons, knives
  • mugs
  • yarn, ribbon
  • glitter pens/glue
  • beads
  • cardstock
  • rubber stamps/ink pad
  • wrapping paper
  • tape
  • graham crackers
  • different colored tubes of icing
  • plastic knives
  • peppermints, gumdrops, Hershey’s kisses, Twizzlers, M&Ms, and other candies

Upcoming Events

  • Nov. 7-9               Spirituality Development Training, Fort Wayne
  • Nov. 23-Dec. 9      Giving Tree collection
  • Nov. 23                 RE Giving Tree fundraiser, Fellowship Hall, noon-2 pm
  • Nov. 30                 Youth-led Spirit Circle for Chalica
  • Dec. 5-6                UU Holiday Art Fair
  • Dec. 7                   Giving Tree shopping field trip; interested fifth-eighth-grade students/families meet in the Fellowship Hall at 12:30 p.m.
  • Dec. 13                  LUM Jubilee Christmas
  • Dec. 21                 Holiday program
  • Jan. 25                   January group birthday celebration, Fellowship Hall, 11:45 a.m

November Nursery Schedule

  • 2            Amelia Rode
  • 9            Fia Esquival
  • 16          Kate French
  • 23          Rachel Smith
  • 30          Kalina Harden

Box City raises awareness about homeless

On Sept. 27, the UU youth group attended an event put on by Family Promise of Lafayette that aimed to raise awareness about homelessness. We kicked off the night with picking out our furniture boxes to decorate and eventually sleep in. Our group’s boxes were declared some of the most artistic and welcoming. After our decorative escapades, we had dinner and heard the stories of two people who had previous experience with homelessness.

Carl, a volunteer for Family Promise, told us about his struggles with substance abuse and how all he needed to overcome it was a hand-up and not a handout. Afterward, Diamond, a nervous 19-year-old, spoke about her experience with our local chapter of Family Promise. The rest of the night passed with a lot of games, discussion, and a talent show. There was a performance by The Conrad Bone Band as well.

It was a great learning experience. It was eye opening to know how far some people will go to hide their homelessness from their closest friends. We came away with a greater understanding of the human suffering around us and the countless ways we can help.

We would like to thank the congregation for their support, the United Methodist Church for hosting us, and Family Promise of Greater Lafayette for organizing this fabulous event.

----Youth Group

Lighted Chalice has new Editorial Team

You won’t see the change; you may not even notice. That’s our goal.

A new editorial team has taken over publication of the Lighted Chalice. This will take the burden off of Karin Bergman, our church administrator.

Karin took over the editing of the newsletter back when it was a monthly publication. As communication evolved, she put together both the newsletter and the weekly Meridian Update. An attempt was made to streamline the process by combining the print and e-mail versions. But that has proved to be a cumbersome task, and the time demands have become overwhelming.

Thus, with the November issue, The Lighted Chalice will now be published on a monthly basis. A team of editors will assemble the newsletter, which will be available by the first of each month.

Because we have a team of people — volunteers, who will assemble the newsletter on their own time — the new deadline for submission is the 15th of the month. Please submit items via the online form http://bit.ly/uuctceventform2.

We will do our very best to continue publication seamlessly. If you have questions, do not hesitate to ask. E-mail us at lightedchalice@gmail.com.

Lighted Chalice editorial committee includes Cindy Gerlach, Lynn Holland, Beverly Cox, Jody Tishmack, Lola Straub, and Alice Pawley.

Jubilee Christmas Needs your help

Would you like to help make Christmas special for local area families in need? LUM Jubilee is our community’s largest Christmas assistance program.

Each December, LUM member churches become Jubilee Toy Shops where low-income parents select new toys and gift certificates to give to their children for Christmas. The families also receive food for their holiday meal and various household staples. Our church is a host site, with support from The Church of the Brethren and The Society of Friends.

This year’s Jubilee will be held at our UU church on Saturday, Dec. 13. How can you get involved? Beginning in November, you can sign up to purchase a children’s toy and deliver it to the church. In addition you can volunteer to be a Jubilee host, helping a family wrap the gifts they select for their children. We are working with the RE program so that our youngest UUs will also get to play a part in Jubilee.

Your generosity and support will help us make Jubilee Christmas a happy and memorable experience for all involved. If you are able to help, please e-mail Jean Tyner at jeantyner@gmail.com.

We Need Your help for Annual Holiday Art Fair

December 5 & 6

The annual UU Art Fair is one of our longest-held traditions. For one weekend in December, the church is transformed into an artists’ and shoppers’ paradise, with fine art of all media available for purchase.

Friday evening is the opening reception, with live music, gourmet food, and wine. The sale continues Saturday. The Art Fair features 50 local artists, with works ranging from print, jewelry, fiber arts, pottery, sculpture, baskets, soaps, wood, clay, ornaments, metal work, glass, and much more.

The Art Fair is an important fund-raiser for our congregation. But it’s also a time to work closely with others, as well as being a fun-filled weekend (not to mention a great place for all your holiday shopping).

Many volunteers are needed in order to make the Art Fair a success.

  • The week before the Art Fair, volunteers will be needed nearly every day. On Monday evening, set-up begins, as the sanctuary, fellowship hall, and classrooms are arranged to make room for the artists’ displays. Holiday decorating helps make the space amenable to the art.
  • On Wednesday and Thursday, artists will be checking in and setting up their displays. Help will be needed to coordinate this process.
  • Cooks are needed to help with making soup and cookies for Trudi’s Café.
  • During the sale, volunteers will be needed to work as gift wrappers, greeters, shop keepers, and to help in the café.
  • And after the show end Saturday, volunteers will be needed to help check out artists and tear down and clean up.

Sign-up sheets will be available in November; contact Lisa Pantea, lisapantea@gmail.com

From the Social Justice Committee: Support the Health Hut

The Health Hut provides toiletries and laundry detergent to low-income families and homeless in Tippecanoe County. The Health Hut is open on the second and fifth Thursdays of each month from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 411 N. Seventh St. in Lafayette. The Health Hut provides the following items: toothbrushes, toothpaste, bar soap, shampoo, razors, deodorant, toilet paper, and laundry detergent. Sometimes we have feminine hygiene products and diapers.

If you are interested in donating items, please take them to First Baptist Church on the second Thursday of the month between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. If you would like to make a donation, please make your check to University Church/Health Hut and mail to First Baptist Church, 411 N. Seventh St, Lafayette, IN, 47901. If you have questions, please email healthhuttipp@gmail.com.

A day in the life of a monk on tour in Lafayette

We watch a small group of Tibetan Buddhist monks construct a sand mandala and chant blessings, awed by their dedication and skill. Such moments in our lives are treasures. Thank you for giving us many such moments this September 2014.

By Cynthi Farfalle

Early, perhaps 6 a.m., a young monk rises, says quiet prayers, washes, and proceeds to the kitchen with a brother monk to begin preparing breakfast. Does he wish to sleep a little longer?

By 7 a.m., other monks are heard rising, praying, washing, or perhaps studying. A morning tea puja is performed. Some monks come to the kitchen for mugs of hot water but return to sleeping/ living quarters to study, perhaps do a little Yoga, or telephone. By 8 a.m., two to six hosts quietly arrive from other homes or rooms in the host home. They all greet one another with nods and quiet good mornings but little conversation.

More than a dozen people are now at home. Doors open and close as monks step into the fresh morning air. Somewhere a shower runs and a toilet flushes. Chanting drifts through the house.

Now a breakfast of oatmeal and butter tea, reheated leftover cooked vegetables and rice, or warm bread and hard boiled eggs appears on the counter for all to partake. By 9 a.m., there is much conversation about the day’s plan, departure times, details about one another’s lives, and whose mother makes the best yogurt. Monks talk quietly, laboring with hosts to exchange information and ideas in English.

What do monks talk about at breakfast, among themselves? Is every conversation profound? (Probably not; one morning the driver translated a funny fart joke.)

Time moves slowly, except it has suddenly flown, and everyone hurries to depart for work on the sand mandala. Items are forgotten; the driver can’t find his shoes, the KP monks must remember food for lunch, one monk wants to make copies somewhere. All is good and everyone arrives safely to meet the public and construct the mandala.

Opening Prayers

Do the prayers bless the space, the work, seek guidance?

The first day of Mandala construction is all rulers, protractors, and black markers. The overall design for inner and outer rings, gates, and mandala borders is drawn. Hosts remember to go buy surgical masks. Where does the colored sand come from? How can they memorize all these intricate details and symbols for each mandala?

During the work, GesheLa meets with an individual to discuss a specific Buddhist teaching, or a host consults with him about a scheduled event. Old friends in the community meet and hug, delighted to be brought together by these hardworking monks. Many conversations take place.

Merchandise is sold. A host and a monk hunch over the computer studying and practicing English words. Some monks depart to teach at a school but work continues on the mandala. Sometime between noon and 2 p.m., lunch is served by the KP monks. Conversation and food are shared by monks, hosts, and guests. How good it must feel to stand and stretch. Do they have special back-strengthening exercises?

The day continues; unexpected needs arise: lotion for poison ivy is sought for monk and host, masking tape is found, one monk needs some used shoes, another a pair of socks. One monk wants to find a pet store and buy special dog medicine which his aunt cannot find in India. Solutions are sought for each small problem.

GesheLa sits reading scripture. Some folks sit in meditation. A toddler squirms, trying to touch the pretty colored sand. A monk unfolds from his stoop, smiles at the child, then studies the mandala before selecting a bowl of sand. The hum of vibrating chakpurs begins and tiny grains of sand form a beautiful line. Clink, Clink, Clink. Unused sand is tapped back into the bowl and monks begin to unfold, rise, adjust their robes.

GesheLa sits where he can reach the bell. They all wrap up in golden fabric taken from a stack, different from the everyday maroon wraps. Do they have their own or just take the next one on the stack? Who teaches them how to wrap, twist, and flip parts of their robes?

Mandala work stops for the day and the monks gather for closing prayers. Afterwards, merchandise is packed up and monks tidy the mandala area as hosts place protective barriers and lock up. The van loads and a small caravan proceeds home, where monks climb the stairs to enjoy time away from Westerners. Hosts may linger to discuss the day and enjoy a dinner KP monks prepare for everyone at home.

Almost always, one or two monks seek conversation, asking questions, practicing English. Stories of life in a Tibetan orphanage or a harrowing escape over the Himalayas are sometimes related, with tears. Many of the touring monks escaping the Chinese occupation of Tibet have watched friends and family beaten and shot. One monk became quite joyful when a phone call came announcing his brother’s release from Chinese prison. He still had another brother and sister in prison, for the crime of practicing Buddhism, joining a monastery and nunnery. A prison term for having the image of the Dalai Lama means eight years of torture, hunger, and possible death.

Some evenings, the monks must again depart to teach, lead meditation, or conduct a House Blessing. The hosts strive to create a balanced schedule of rest and work, always mindful of the message of peace and the need to generate donations. Substantial private donations are arranged for mandala construction, school visits, and any activity in which they participate. Suggested amounts are the minimum needed.

School visits delight, even when a few students appear uninterested. Most are fascinated. These monks are learned men and encourage our youth to study hard and respect their teachers. One question seemed to stump GesheLa. How old is the oldest monk in the monastery? Some of the young children were frightened during the snow lion dance until they were allowed to pet it. Then the monks asked for photos with the children and grinned broadly as they played a guessing game. Which monks made the snow lion dance? Who was the head?

Most evenings the monks are home between 8 and 9 p.m. If the evening blessing has been missed, GesheLa conducts a tea puja. Once, a host mistakenly requested a traditional Tibetan folksong without first asking GesheLa. After an awkward pause, the chant master was given permission. Haunting Tibetan floated over us, as an ancient love song was shared.

All non-residents depart by 9 p.m., giving the monks nearly 12 hours respite from the effort to courteously communicate. They gather in different spots, nodding and smiling if they pass a host reading in a corner or making tea. Showers are taken, laundry is done, scripture is read, donations are counted, and mug after mug is filled with hot water.

It is difficult to imagine what this experience for foreigners in a foreign land is like, but we hosts feel an increasing fatigue and peacefulness. Sleep comes at different hours: in beds, on cots with mismatched sheets, or sometimes a carpeted floor. Monks have been known to enjoy watching a little basketball, wrestling, or old Kung Fu movies. One monk stays awake until 2 a.m., fixing the credit card machine. Another sets his phone alarm to awaken at 2 a.m. and Skype his home village phone, where his parents are waiting to talk with him. Sounds of running water or a softly chanted prayer may still be heard. The hosts move quietly in a limited area of the home, respecting the challenges of living and touring for a year in a foreign land.

Attention Amazon shoppers

You can benefit the UU church through your Amazon.com purchases.

To date, your online purchases have earned more than $1300 for the UUC. By using the Amazon link on the church website, we earn a 5 percent referral fee on nearly all Amazon.com purchases, at no additional cost to you. Your prices and shopping experience remain unchanged.

Follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Links page on the church website: http://uuctc.org/links/
  2. Click on the Amazon.com link.

NOTE: You may notice that Amazon also has a separate site, called Amazon Smile, that lets you choose a non-profit organization to receive a (very) small percentage for every purchase you make. At this time, please do NOT use this site in an attempt to benefit the UUC, as the reimbursement rate from Amazon Smile is much lower than we receive through the normal site.

Contact Mark VanMeeter at mvanmeeter@comcast.net if you have any questions.

Under Our Roof

Mary Pantea suffered a heart attack earlier this month in Pittsburgh while visiting her grandson, Carter Kiser. She is now recovering in the health care unit of University Place in West Lafayette, happy to be back home among her friends and daughter and son-in-law, Lisa Pantea and Dan Lybrook.

November Board Meeting

Tuesday, Nov. 11, 6:30 pm, Room 101/103

The UU Board of Trustees meets the second Tuesday of each month in Room 101/103. Meetings are open, and church members are always welcome to attend; participation is encouraged. If you can’t attend board meetings, please speak with members of the Board regarding congregational questions or concerns.

November 2014 CALENDAR

1 Saturday

8 am        Zen M

7 pm        IRN (Inter-Religious Network Conversation Circles: Abrahamic Faith) Dinner & discussion, Room 101/103

2 Sunday

9:00 am  Forum (101/103):

10:30 am Worship & RE

11:45 am Potluck Sunday

11:45 am Stewardship: Wrap Up (101/103)

7:30 pm  Lafayette Area Peace Coalition (101/103)

3 Monday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1:30 pm  Writers’ Group 101/103

6 pm        Buddhism Discussion Group with Monica Ward (101/103)

7 pm        Meeting (anon FH)

7 pm        Monday Meditation (101/103)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

4 Tuesday

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1 pm        Old Path White Clouds (101/103)

6 pm        Program Council (101/103)

7 pm        Lafayette Chamber Singers (S)

5 Wednesday

7:30 AM Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon “The Principled Group” Noon Discussion (101/103)

2:30 pm  Girl Scout Troop (FH)

6 pm        Meeting (anon) 101/103

6 Thursday

5:30 pm  Zazen Sitting, Chanting & Reading (M)

5:40 pm  Dinner @MCL

6 pm        Finance Committee (104)

7 pm       Strolling Singers (S)

7 Friday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

6:30 pm  PRYSM (102)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

8 Saturday

8 am        Zen M

9 Sunday

9 am        Forum (101/103)

10:30 am  Worship & RE

11:30 am UU Talk and Tour following service

Noon UU Membership Class: Discovering Your Spiritual Path (104)

10 Monday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

5:30 pm  Pastoral Care 102

7 pm        Meeting (anon FH)

7 pm        Monday Meditation (101/103)

7 pm       Strolling Singers (S)

7 pm       Drumming Lesson (S)

11 Tuesday

VETERAN’S DAY: OFFICE CLOSED

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1 pm        Old Path White Clouds (101/103)

6:30 pm  BOARD MEETING (101/103)

7 pm        ACLU-IN BOARD (American Civil Liberties Union)

7 pm        Lafayette Chamber Singers (S)

12 Wednesday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        “The Principled Group” Noon Discussion (101/103)

2:30 pm  Girl Scout Troop (FH)

6 pm        Meeting (anon.), 101/103

13 Thursday

5:30 pm  Worship Committee (106)

5:30 pm  Zazen Sitting, Chanting & Reading

5:40 pm  Dinner @MCL

7 pm        Social Justice Committee Mtg (104)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

14 Friday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

15 Saturday

8 am        Zen M

10 am   Jason Kniola A-REC Workshop (101/103): Introduction to Daily Meditation Techniques

4:30 pm  Denise Wilson Non-Audition Choir Celebration Reception (FH)

16 Sunday

9 am        Forum (101/103):

10:30 am Worship & RE

4 pm        UU Photo Group (101/103)

17 Monday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1:30 pm  Writers’ Group 101/103

6 pm        Buddhism Discussion Group with Monica Ward (101/103)

6 pm        Safety Committee (104)

7 pm        Meeting (anon FH)

7 pm        Monday Meditation (101/103)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

18 Tuesday

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1 pm        Old Path White Clouds (101/103)

7 pm        Lafayette Chamber Singers (S)

19 Wednesday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

9 am        All Day Old Tippecanoe Quilting Guild (FH)

Noon        “The Principled Group” Noon Discussion (101/103)

2:30 pm  Girl Scout Troop (FH)

6 pm        Meeting (anon) 101/103

20 Thursday

5:30 pm  Zazen Sitting, Chanting & Reading

5:40 pm  Dinner @MCL

6:30 pm  IVOW Dream Study Group (102)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

21 Friday

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

6:30 pm  PRYSM (102)

7 pm  Strolling Singers (S)

22 Saturday

8 am Zen M

23 Sunday

RE Giving Tree Collection

9 am        Forum (101/103)

10:30 am Worship & RE

Noon        Giving Tree Fundraiser Event (FH)

4 pm        Interreligious Network Thanksgiving Service at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Center, West Lafayette, IN

24 Monday

RE Giving Tree Collection

7:30 am Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        Meeting (FH)

7 pm        Meeting (anon FH)

7 pm        Monday Meditation (101/103)

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

25 Tuesday

RE Giving Tree Collection

Noon        Meeting (FH)

1 pm        Old Path White Clouds (101/103)

6:30 pm  Committee on Ministry (102)

7 pm        Lafayette Chamber Singers (S)

26 Wednesday

RE Giving Tree Collection

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon        “The Principled Group” Noon Discussion (101/103)

2:30 pm  Girl Scout Troop (FH)

2:30 pm  Girl Scout Troop 2500 (FH)

6 pm        Meeting (anon) 101/103

27 Thursday

RE Giving Tree Collection

THANKSGIVING: OFFICE CLOSED

5:30 pm  Zazen Sitting, Chanting & Reading

7 pm        Strolling Singers (S)

28 Friday

DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING: OFFICE CLOSED

Purdue Thanksgiving Break

RE Giving Tree Collection

7:30 am  Taiji Qigong with Lisa Peterson

Noon Meeting (FH)

7 pm Strolling Singers (S)

29 Saturday

Purdue Thanksgiving Break

RE Giving Tree Collection

8 am Zen M

30 Sunday

RE Giving Tree Collection

9 am Forum (101/103)

10:30 am Worship & RE: Youth Led Spirit Circle for Chalica

Coming in December

Dec. 5-6      Holiday Art Fair
Dec. 7         Youth Shop for Jubilee Christmas
Dec. 13       LUM Jubilee Christmas
Dec. 21       RE Holiday Pageant
Dec. 24       Christmas Eve Candlelight Service